In golf we trust: it was banned by King James II but given royal patronage by King James IV

Golf has been a religion in Scotland since King James II banned it in 1457. The reason? His subjects preferred it to archery practice, which made it a threat to national security.

Half a century later, it received royal patronage from James IV, who paid 14 shillings to a Perth merchant for a set of clubs, only to lose three times that amount in a match with the Earl of Bothwell.

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The club that changed golf forever: how golf became a different game

JIM SIMONS STOOD ON THE 18TH TEE AT PEBBLE BEACH ONE SUNDAY afternoon in 1982, and although he couldn’t have known it at the time, he faced a choice between the past and the future. Leading the Crosby by two, more than four years removed from his last victory and desperate to find the fairway, he ignored tradition and reached for the club that would redirect the course of golfhistory. It was a metal wood, still largely a curiosity in golf. “No fire is going to catch in his bag,” CBS television analyst Ken Venturi said on the air.

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Lesson tee

BASICS

Where goeth the waggle?

The waggle is an overlooked, if not entirely forgotten, part of the swing. Few teachers explain to a beginner its purpose or how to develop a waggle that sets the stage for a smooth, powerful swing. The series of small movements you make with the club at address isn’t just for show.

The purpose of the waggle is to establish rhythm and ease the tension in your hands and wrists. The ideal waggle is highly personalized–it doesn’t matter if you move the club from side to side or up and down. However, the waggle should be slow, in order to impart a nice, rhythmic cadence. You should be able to feel the weight of the clubhead at the end of the shaft, so you and the club can act as one when beginning the takeaway.

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